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A Guide To Rallycross in 60 seconds

Rallycross is one of the most exciting and fastest growing sports around – but what exactly is it? Luckily, Paige Bellerby knows a thing or two about the sport… Here’s her quickfire guide.




How and when the sport was founded
The first ever Rallycross event was in 1967. This came about because of the foot and mouth epidemic which caused the cancellation in rallying, so people took to racing on a track. The first event run as we know it now today was at Lydden Hill near Dover, Kent.

Race format
A Rallycross track consists of 40% loose surface and 60% sealed surface. Each event starts with a ‘free practice’, where each driver is allowed 3 timed laps of the circuit. This is followed by 3x qualifying heats which are all timed to give each driver their overall positioning on the grid for the semi-final.

The top 16 cars in each class are then split into their semi-final grids (2x races of 8). Now every driver is competing for position as the top 4 drivers of each semi-final go through to the final and the remaining 4 are knocked out of the event.

Finally, this leaves the final race of the day for each car class, the winners of which take the overall class points.

 
To be a rallycross driver you must have excellent car control, to be able to deal with a bit of pushing and shoving and have a large amount of cunning.

Paige Bellerby




What attributes should a rallycross car have?
A suitable rallycross car should have good traction, stability, and a power to weight ratio that works for that particular vehicle.

Vehicles and classes
There are various classes within the British Rallycross Championship which support the Motors Sports Association (MSA) acknowledged classes. These are: the MSA Junior Rallycross Championship, the MSA Super-National Rallycross Championship, and The MSA British Rallycross Championship class which is a class of 4-wheel-drive 600bhp supercars.

What skills do you need to be a successful rallycross driver?
To be a rallycross driver you must have excellent car control, to be able to deal with a bit of pushing and shoving and have a large amount of cunning. Often when racing it’s the person that can outsmart the other drivers that is most likely to come out on top.

How to get involved and start competing
The first thing would be to find a class that fits the driver’s budget and also decide whether to buy, build or hire a rallycross car. You would also need a licence to suit the class (either national A or B), which is obtained from the MSA. Once you have the necessary licence and the car you simply enter a meeting via the British Automobile Racing Club (BARC), turn up and race… it’s that simple!



A Guide To Rallycross in 60 seconds
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