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The Moon landing remains one of humanity’s proudest achievements, closing the divide between us and that pearly presence in the night sky. As we approach a half century since that iconic moment, we delve into how the Moon continues to fascinate us…

One of humankind’s greatest strengths remains that we’re never content to rest on our laurels. Through the pioneers among us, we’ve travelled far and wide, above and beyond, progressing from the age of the abacus to today’s Cloud-connected mobile phones. Yet few achievements compare to the Moon landing – a mission completed, astonishingly, using less computing power than the devices we carry in our pockets or handbags each day!

The 20th July 2019 marks the 50th year anniversary since Neil Armstrong take humankind’s very first steps on the Moon. A pivotal moment in history, and one that saw millions of people around the world watching the launch of Apollo 11, our very own co-founder Mike France recalls that day. “I remember, a spellbound schoolboy, watching Neil Armstrong step onto the moon’s surface”; and with that, one of the biggest events of the 20th Century sparked the ignition of our imaginations…

Apollo 11 landing craft on the moon

Footsteps on the moon

Music

The classic Frank Sinatra based his renowned ‘Fly Me to the Moon’ cover specifically on the Apollo missions. Although recorded five years before Apollo 11’s landing, the song’s place in lunar folklore was confirmed when Buzz Aldrin pressed play on his cassette player, making it the first piece of music to ever be heard on the Moon!

Fiction

The Moon has long proved a peculiar inspiration to creatives throughout the generations, influencing many works on the page and screen. Released in 1902, Georges Méliès’ spectacular film “A Trip to the Moon” used cutting-edge special effects to portray a rocket crashing into ‘the Man on the Moon’ – in this case, a grimacing individual with shaving foam on his face. This fascination continued into the latter half of the 20th century, from Sci-Fi classic Star Trek and British TV show The Clangers, to influencing The Adventures of Tintin illustrator Hergé to travel back in time to his comic edition ‘Destination Moon’, illustrating Tintin and friends greeting a startled Neil Armstrong with roses and a welcome sign.

Fast-forward 50 years, and the legacy of the Moon landing remains every bit as vital. Its impact even permeated into the classic kid’s film Toy Story, basing Buzz Lightyear’s name on none other than Astronaut Buzz Aldrin. Not just a film about talking toys, the franchise relayed the message to younger generations to work together and strive for better – to infinity and beyond!

Horology

“That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind” – and one huge spring in the world of watches! Buzz Aldrin wore an Omega Speedmaster Professional Chronograph whilst taking his first steps on the Moon, and – much to the delight of Omega’s marketing team, we’re sure! – the ‘Moonwatch’ was born. Yet horology’s obsession with our lunar neighbour began many centuries before.

With its links to the calendars of many civilisations, it was only a matter of time before somebody created the first mechanism capable of tracking the phase of the Moon. Now, we weren’t that person; but Calibre JJ04, the in-house modification that features inside our new C1 Moonglow, marks a brilliant entry into one of the most romantic genres of watchmaking.

C1 Moonglow

Remaining accurate to a day every 128 years of the Luna cycle, the C1 Moonglow is admirable whilst still affordable. The moon glides gracefully across the star-filled night sky, enhanced with Grade X1 GL C1 Super-LumiNova® to create that truly special glow. One of the brightest watches we’ve ever made, we hope you’ll agree its visuals are simply out-of-this-world!

Discover the Lunar Collection, containing both the C1 Moonglow and C1 Grand Malvern Moonphase.

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